Supermom raised two MLB sons, Tylor Megill, Trevor Megill

This mom hit a home run when it came to raising athletes.

Julie Megill of Long Beach, California, raised two Major League pitchers — Tylor, the Mets 26-year-old phenom, and Trevor, 28, a reliever for the Twins – yet credits her other half as the family’s MVP in the DNA department.

“My husband’s very athletic, so that’s a start,” she said of hubby Kevin, who was a rower at Orange Coast College and UCLA. “They’re tall, they have that going for them; all of them are giants. ” Tylor is 6-7 and Trevor is 6-8.

The genetic hat trick came when daughter daughter, Ryleigh, now 22 and 5-foot-11, was born. She is a rower at the University of Southern California, where she is graduating this month.

Being their cheerleader and chauffeur “two to three times a week times two” surely factored into her kids ’success stories.

Left, New York Mets pitcher Tylor Megill in car seat, and right, Trevor with mom Julie.
Family handout

“She’s the one that was taking us everywhere when my dad was working,” Tylor told The Post in an interview where he expressed his Mother’s Day appreciation.

“I love her and thank her for her support throughout all the years,” he said. “Everything that she sacrificed as well as my family sacrificed to allow me to live out my dreams – it means the world to me.”

The commitment to her sons’ sports also led her to a career as a full-time photographer. “I used to shoot all the baseball games and then I would shoot other teams, making money on the weekend and it just kind of grew from there,” she said.

New York Mets pitcher Tylor Megill being held by mom next to brother Trevor.
New York Mets pitcher Tylor Megill being held by mom next to brother Trevor.
Family handout

Julie also credits Kevin’s job as a sales and education rep for a nutrition company for her kids’ abilities.

“We’ve had access to all the best trainers and sports medicine and sports nutrition,” she said.

The couple – both California natives – met at the gym. “My dad went and talked to her and got her number and the rest is history,” Tylor explained.

Now, the proud parents host baseball watch parties for family and friends at their home.

The Megill bros, who were born 20 months apart and debuted in the MLB two months apart last year.
The Megill bros, who were born 20 months apart and debuted in the MLB two months apart last year.
Photo by Julio Aguilar / Getty Images)

“Our house is always open if [starting pitcher Tylor is] pitching. We usually have anywhere from five to 30 people, ”she said.

And if the Megill brothers, who were born 20 months apart and debuted in the big leagues two months apart last year, play against each other, “We’d be cheering for both teams,” Julie said.

The no-hitter Tylor pitched along with four of his teammates on April 29 against Philadelphia was a career highlight – for both mom and son.

The genetic hat trick came when daughter daughter, Ryleigh, (right) now 24 and 5-foot-11, was born.
The genetic hat trick came when daughter daughter, Ryleigh, (right) now 24 and 5-foot-11, was born.
Family handout

“It was just truly amazing, everything how it all comes together for him,” she said. “What he worked his whole life for and what we sacrificed our whole life for are moments like these.”

Julie has been to Queens four times to visit Tylor and already has her favorite spots in the borough.

“I’m actually in love with Astoria… it’s the cutest neighborhood, absolutely amazing,” she said. Truva is her favorite place to eat there.

Julie Megill raised two MLB pitchers — Tylor, the Mets 26-year-old phenom, and Trevor, 28, a reliever for the Twins.
Julie Megill raised two Major League pitchers – Tylor, the Mets 26-year-old phenom, and Trevor, 28, a reliever for the Twins.
SINGLE SHOT PHOTOGRAPHY

“And then we got introduced to Parkside, which is Tylor’s favorite restaurant. That’s gonna be our new go-to place because he’s in with the owners now and everything, ”she said of the Corona culinary landmark.

In fact, Tylor’s childhood nickname Scooby came partly from his eating habits – and his favorite TV show.

“I loved watching ‘Scooby-Doo’ as a kid,” Tylor explained. “That was my show.”

“Well that and when he was growing up he was hypoglycemic, so he had to eat all the time and he was always snacking in the dugout,” Julie said.

Meanwhile, she’s anxiously awaiting a Mama Megill jersey that is being custom-made for her. And she’s particular about what trophies she saves from her sons and daughter.

“Second place kind of all went in the trash,” she said. “We’re not playing for snacks.”

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